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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 89 (615 MHz)

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mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 9, San Francisco 8, Malan 7, The City 3, Davidson 3, Brown 3, Budapest 2, Hollywood 2, U.s. 2, Hungarian 2, California 2, Holley 2, Jonathan 2, Bernice 2, Ofneo Nazis 1, Fred 1, Prague 1, Albany 1, Bernices 1, Roma 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    December 2, 2012
    5:00 - 5:30pm PST  

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my uncle's legacy is being kept alive, not just by those wonderful people that we see here who spoke, the mayor and mayor brown, mayor lee, those that have gone on into the state senate and the state assembly, by those that have gone on to the national stage representing not only the lgbt community, but every marginalized community we've had in this country. the chorus that i'll talk about in a minute who got their first public performance on the night that harvey and george were taken from us. but mayor brown called them two extraordinary individuals. actually, mayor brown shared that with me four years ago. it has stayed with me. harvey and george, they put in place, as the mayor said, a foundation of what we see today in equality and justice.
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we actually live in an extraordinary time because of the shoulders created by george and harvey. we live in an extraordinary moment because each of you believe you're worthy because each of you have a gift of authenticity to offer the world. and each of you are here tonight with not only the moscone and milk family, but the true meaning of the human family, in remembrance of the sacrifices that have taken us to get us here and as a sacred reminder not to forget and not to go back. supervisor ammiano very brilliantly brought up harvey was tremendously impacted by world war ii. i wear his class ring from high school. he graduated in 1947, just a couple years after the end of world war ii. he could never understand how communities could turn on themselves. and he was, i really think he made a sacred intention to light that message to the world, that we can't go back.
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in the u.s. today we have so much to be proud of. the last door that i knocked on on november the 5th campaigning for president obama, a dignified elderly 92 year old woman named bernice opened the door in my get out the vote identification, identified her supporting equality. and she looked at me and she looked at my official obama pen that said lgbt for obama and she looked at me with tears in her eyes and she said, our time has really come, hasn't it? we both cried. that moment with bernice takes some of the pain of this day away. on this day i always feel a heightened affinity with my uncle for this was that night 34 years ago that i had to first reflect on my own
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conversations with harvey. anyone who has had conversations with harvey will know, you cannot get away easy. and he didn't let me as a teenager get away easy either. i had to reflect about the meaning of those conversations. it was a day that i had to look hard at what his love and guidance would mean to me that that was gone, that i could only think of the words and the conversations that we had. my uncle was moved by all extraordinary heroes of authenticity that he would see, particularly when it wasn't pretty or easy for them. that is in many ways where the milk foundation is today. we will go where no one else will go. we will go when other organizations and activists had said no. we will go where there seems to be little hope. harvey -- i feel this tremendous affinity when i see a tape of a newscaster saying to harvey, we couldn't get
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anyone else, so, we got you. and harvey said, i know, you couldn't find anyone else, you got me. let's discuss the issues. because we usually -- i usually am the last person called, so, we don't say no, we go. so, let me introduce you tonight to just one person who represents thousands across the world. his name is malan rosa. i told jonathan this story and i decided to include it here. he's someone who reached out to us because he couldn't get anyone else. central europe last year, budapest, the czech republic had gone from a leading country in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt
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people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do
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you think this is how harvey felt? and i said to him, it's exactly how harvey felt. now, after the march i learned that malan had refused to go into the one sponsor that the pride had left, which was a bar, because they wouldn't let in people from the roma community. and he said, no, that is not the way we're going to do things. and he wouldn't go in. when i left and when i landed back in the u.s., i found out that malan also had another struggle. he went home that night and because he was on tv and because he was the spokesperson for hungarian pride, he walked in to find his father hanging. malan's courage doesn't end there. i spent a long time that week skyping with him, encouraging him to go on. he was very depressed. i got an urgent call a week later for the first pride ever
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in prague. and the president of the czech republic, this is 2011, said, ask the people, president class, to rise up and put down the lgbt pride to stop -- to stop the promotion of homosexualism and deviancy. and i went. and when i was picked up at the airport, they said that they were struggling with one of those street-long rainbow flags, but they had reached out across central europe and there was a young man who heard their call and was taking a nine-hour overnight bus to bring them that street-long pride flag. his name was malan rosa. i said, i want to go pick him up. he had no place to stay. he had to scrounge up the money. but this is the type of courage
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that we see following harvey and george around the world. he had just buried his father who blamed his suicide on his son. he was weary and bruised, yet he still got up and did what needs to be done. extraordinary individuals. so, let me just say that for malan's story, i have the honor next month -- i had been invited to the white house, and i'm taking malan with me to introduce him to the president and the first lady. and i & i'm taking malan because i want him and hundreds of activists that have faced a life very much like what harvey and george faced 34 years ago, i want them to know that they have a president, that they have mayors, that they have supervisors, that they have family members, that they have a nation and a continent that is not just moving ourselves forward with equality, but we're not going to leave them
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behind, that we stand there with them. [cheering and applauding] >> let me close with the words of my uncle, many of very few people have heard some of my uncle's words. i love the fact that jonathan brought up hollywood. my uncle was not someone who met someone on a subway and said, i didn't do anything in the first half of my life. that's good for hollywood. the reality is that he had in his very makeup a belief in justice and equality. for in 1951, my uncle was writing a column at albany state teachers college about -- and i'm going to read you -- the one that he wrote entitled ordinary and extraordinary. sometimes i think harvey almost makes these things happen that
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we all talked about the same thing. so, he said in the article, "i have yet to meet anyone who was ordinary, on this campus or at any time in my 21 years -- he was 21. now, i've met people who believed they are ordinary. i've met people who believed most of us -- most of those around them are ordinary. people who have been told they do not have something special inside of them, people who have forgotten the hope that begins in their own heart. i have played on many ball teams. i have never heard the propaganda of average and ordinary feel either individual or collective success. i have never seen a successful culture hold up the legends of their sport as ordinary because ordinary is not our potential. when we find the courage to see that we and all around us are extraordinary, we find the courage to sing the song that rides inside of all of us, not
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only you and me, but all of us achieve. this writer is asking you to stop the next professor, to stop the next student, to stop the next lecture who calls you ordinary. or he says, a sports legend is ordinary, or anyone is ordinary. tell them no. tell them we are all -- we all have something extraordinary, a voice, a talent, a song. it's not easy to hear that song that everyone has inside of them. it's not easy to see the extraordinary in everyone. but it's easy -- but easy is not our challenge. hope is the extraordinary. hope in the extraordinary is our challenge. hope in the extraordinary is what makes us human. " it's amazing harvey wrote that when he was 21. for all the bernices, for all the malan rosas.
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for all the beloved us's that my uncle would talk about, for you, as my uncle would say, and you, and you, and you, our time has come. we will not stop until we have equality across the globe. and that is what tonight means. thank you so much. [cheering and applauding] >> thank you, stuart. that was spectacular. it really captured your uncle there. thank you. we're going to close with the san francisco gay men's chorus performing, singing for our lives. i had a couple of announcements. i hope you will all join us on the candle light march up to the castro. we have candles over here if people didn't bring them, so, you can pick them up at the start of our march. i also want to thank the san
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francisco police department who is going to help facilitate our march by closing blocks as we move up. so, they are going to be helping. and the chief is here, greg, you're out there someplace. (applause) >> thanks, there he is. thanks very much, fred. we love having a progressive police chief in town. so, i want to thank all of my speakers here, all of our speakers tonight with some very inspirational words. and i want to thank each and every one of you for coming. i hope you will join us in the march, and we are going to end with the san francisco gay men's chorus performing "singing for our lives." thank you. >> let me just say that the story of this song was written on the way holley near and joan baez were coming here to 34 years ago to the steps of city
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hall. and she wrote this as an anthem, coming 34 years ago to the steps of city hall. so, holley nears, we are angry people. ♪ we are gentle angry people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are here together and we are singing, singing for our lives we are gay and straight together
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and we are singing, singing for our lives we are [speaker not understood] speaking people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are [speaker not understood] speaking people and and we are singing singing for our lives we are a land of many colors and we are singing singing for our lives we are a land of many colors and we are singing singing for our lives
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we are gentle angry people and we are singing singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing singing for our lives ♪ [cheering and applauding] >> when there's good children's theater, it is good theater. if it is good theater, you
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would like it. even if it is for children that, is what i think. i know for the velveteen rabbit, i feel it is a story for kids and much older people. it is about being a young child and loving a toy or friend and it is also about what it means to get old. in 1986 my son was 2. i decided i would like to adapt the velveteen rabbit. mind you, i had never read it as a child but heard it as a mother. my first time was a bedtime story recording. it was through that that i defined the theme and really determined how i was going to produce the story. is it true listening to it.
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when i made the dance i watched my son, since i have been taking him to live performances since he was 6 years old. he loved it when he saw his peers or when someone was reading to him or he heard language. early when the bunny first comes out they go, ah, the rabbit. i think talking, flying, something they can relate to. and the adults love nana. nan na is the main adult figure in the show. the fairy is played by the same person. fair is very much like the
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love for your first child. pure love. nature is a beautiful thing. all wild rabbits come from nature. i think nature is mysterious, beautiful, not something our kids get very much these days. there's fantastical spectacle because of computers and film. i think in live performance, in a way being paired down, you can be more successful and ask everybody to buy into the world you are in. if it is a simple world they will buy in, as long as the world is consistent that you have on stage. in some ways i also want that message for kids.
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it doesn't have to be spectacle but how you feel and having fun and taking things seriously, not about being blown away. >> what is real? it is a thing that happens to you when a child loves you for a long, long time. >> i think it is a success. for the most part if you are three to seven, you sit in the seats and most of the time the kids are engaged. they laugh and ask questions. i think that is success. the fact we tour it and do it here, it is lasting. i really want to say the reason it is lasting is because of the story marjorie williams wrote is a gem of a story. if it was just an okay story, it wouldn't have lasted this long.
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i have had people say that is the first show i ever saw, that is why i am a choreographer. i have had people that have come back when they are 20 and 23 years old. little kids and people in their 50s and 60s are telling me how much they love it. they come back more than once, they come back year after year.>> hi, my name is ja. in this episode, we are featuring the romantic park
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locations in your very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. our first look out is here at buena vista park, a favorite with couples and dog lovers. it is as old as its neighbor and both have a significant forest, a refreshing retreat from urban life. the pass that meander we do under a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the
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eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs.
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there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. take your camera and be prepared to review the city in a way you will not forget. it is prominent with beautiful formations that are perfect to watch the sunrise from the east over the bay. this is another one of our great look out. we are at mount davidson. it has the highest point of elevation in san francisco, 928 feet. this is the place for you to bring someone special.
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enjoy all of the pathways, trails, and greenery that surrounds you. it provides a peaceful oasis of public open space and great hiking trails. the spectacular view offers a perfect place to watch the sunrise, or, sunset, with someone you love. >> it is a good place to get away from the hectic life of the city. get some fresh air. the view is fantastic. >> wear sturdy shoes to conquer the trail, you have the feeling of being in a rain forest. mount davidson is also a great place to escape the noise and the apostle of the city with your partner. -- bustle of the city with your partner. it is quite a hike to the top at mount davidson but the view is
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worth every step. this is the place to bring that someone special. for more information about reserving one of these romantic locations, or any other location, 831-5500. this number is best for special ovens, weddings, picnics, and the county for building. for any athletic field and neighborhood parks, call 831- 5510. you can also write us at permits and reservations. or walking in and say hello at old log cabin, golden gate park. and of course you can find more information at sfrecpark.org.
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>> hello, i am with the san francisco parks department serious we are featuring some wonderful locations in your and very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. we are here at the lovely and historic palace of fine arts, located in the bustling marina district. originally built for the 1950's exposition, the palace is situated along san francisco's waterfront.
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it is ada accessible and is reached by the 28, 30, and 91 bus lines. with its rotunda, columns, uncut the reflecting waters against the eucalyptus trees, it is one of the most romantic settings for special dates, and memorable proposals. it is also a perfect spot where you can relax with that special someone while listening to the water and fountain in the lagoon. beautiful to view from many locations, and inside is an ideal place to walk around with your loved ones. the palace is the most popular wedding location in the city park system. reservations for weddings and other events are available at strecpark.org.
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shakespeares' guard and refers -- has plants referred to in shakespeare's plays and poems. located near the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the

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